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  2. Here is the pattern for the front spring hangers, there are four pieces like this all 1/4" material that welds on each side of the chassis horn. The blue line shows were the 1/4" plates go to box in the bottom of hanger and where the actual spring hanger welds onto the base. The red line just shows the outline of the chassis horn. These will have two 3/8" holes drilled and tapped so Buzzweld etch primer, CIO & WAR can be applied to the inside of the boxed section and then a bolt with sealant put in holes to seal it up, till want to check and re-coat if needed, all boxed in sections will have either taped holes or drain holes, depending on location and situation so all interior areas will be coated with Buzzweld etch primer, CIO & war. All the outer surfaces of the chassis, axles, driveline ect, will be coated in Buzzweld 2K Armor, CIO & WAR. Rust should not be a problem! lol Cheers, Allen
  3. Tis is the rear spring hanger, it's being made in 1/4" material, each side takes two side plates and the 1/4" dark line on the pattern is showing where the 3" wide plate gets welded to make a box, then the 1/4" spring hanger with reinforcing piece that gets welded in is welded to the bottom like in the pic. The hole of the spring hanger is 2" lower, like the military version and 2" to the rear to increase the wheelbase by 2" to 90", the rear shackle hangers are moved rearward 2" also, of course. The drawing, real high tech eh? lol Pattern made and test fitted. Final pattern checked against the drawing. Shoeing how the spring hanger fits. And one of the spring hanger. I'll take pics of the front spring hanger tomorrow. Cheers, Allen
  4. This is the bolt in cross member that goes under the gearbox, 1-1/2"x 2" x 3/16" and it will have the 3/16" angled front reinforcement (already made but didn't get pic) drilled and tapped for application of etch primer, CIO & WAR. The outer ends will be cut, boxed in and will bolt to brackets welded to the chassis rail. Cutting out the 3/16" rear axle truss. This is all the pieces cut out of 3mm, ready to be welded up to make up all six outriggers. The bulkhead outriggers will have holes apply etch primer, CIO & WAR to the insides. Cheers, Allen
  5. I haven't been able to make as much progress as I had hoped to recently, did get some smaller parts designed and built, ready for welding. But next week I'll be getting the steel so I can finish building the chassis! Right after I build a welding cart for my new welder. :-) Decided to go ahead and get a good welder, a Hobart 210 MVP and is big enough to weld anything on the build, actually it can can weld up 3/8'. This is the under the flywheel bolt in cross member, it's 2"x 3"x 3/16" with 1/4" plates to bolt through the chassis rails using sleeves in the bolt holes. The first pic shows it without the 1-1/2"x 1-1/2" x 3/16" angle and the 3/16" vertical reinforcements from the tubes to the plates, the second pic shows them sitting in place. The angle pieces will be welded to the main cross member for reinforcement, but mostly to have an angled face on the front the cross member so if it hits a rock or something, it doesn't present a flat face to take the impact and help it slide up and over, since it's going to get smacked on occasion. Both the 2"x 3" tubes and the angle section will have either 3/8" or 1/2" holes drilled and tapped so can coat insides with etch prime, CIO and WAR, then thread a bolt in the holes to seal them up, later can unbolt them, flush insides and recoat if wanted. These are the vertical braces tying in the 2 x 3 to the side plates, and making them all uniform size. Cheers, Allen
  6. Rusty bolts and things hold you up? Lizardskin would be a good product to incorporate into your rebuild there.
  7. Well that didn't work! So much for thinking that I could get it stripped over the next week!! Finally got back to it yesterday and got the b/c pillars off and the rear tub, I should manage a couple of hours on it again over the weekend so hopefully I'll get the bulkhead stripped down ready for removal. So far I've had to cut off over half the bolts I think the last under seal was a bit late as it had rusted out most of the fixings. Still happy with its condition though just the bulkhead that's worse than expected, I need to keep this moving forward before I forget where all the bolts go πŸ€”
  8. Working on the bolt in under flywheel and gearbox cross members currently. Hopefully will have them made and in their jigs soon. Soon as I do I'll post pics.
  9. When you blast the Balls, for best adhesion Blast to a surface profile of 50>75 microns. Lovely work, and great to see it.
  10. The knuckle balls and the rest of the axle assembly will be sand blasted to get good uniform surface, then coated with 2K Armor, top coated with satin CIO and then coated in WAR. Should last a long time! :-)
  11. This is the steering knuckle assembly. It has the 1" thick steering arm, ARP 2000 knuckle studs. The cone washers & nuts haven't gotten here yet, donused two cap bolts to hold it in place for pic. The Rock rings, dust shield eliminatior, HD bottom cap with grade 12.9 cap bolts & grade 8 spindle studs. With the junk hub for mock up. The RH steering arm. Cheers, Allen
  12. This is the components of the front shackle hanger that goes through the chassis rails. It's 2"x1/4" DOM tube, 1.5" bushings and sleeve. This is a pic with the 3/8" thick shackles on the tube. The rear shackle hanger assembly. 2"x1/4" DOM tube and 1/4" base that the tube will be welded into and that welded to the chassis rails. With the 3/8" shackles sitting in position.
  13. This is the front axle short side. It is to short without the extension sleeve and about 1" too long with it.So had to set it up in lathe indexed off the factory machined section of the inside at the ends of the housing. Then machine a section on the outside of the housing for a steady rest to sit and then use boring bar to deepen the machined section for the sleeve on the short side to sit and the same thing done on the long side for the knuckle ball to sit, because it needed to be shortened. A tube will be machined to fit over the machined section,to be a bit larger in diameter than the housing for added strength on both ends. the short side componets. The short side components as they will be welded in. Then the same of the long side. Cheers, Allen
  14. I got the machining done on the axle housings. This is a front housing. This is the rear axle. The machined area on the housing gets a tube with it's ID machined to tightly fit on the housing and the OD of the tube sleeve, machined to 3.5" for the FF/Disc flange to fit and a bit larger diameter on the inboard side of the flange so they have a shoulder to set against to help lone them up. Here the flange has a front spindle bolted on. Hers is a shot of it with a front hub fitted. That hub is a junk hub just being used for mock up. Waiting for the 'new' hubs to get here.
  15. Product Description CIO Chassis In One incorporates the best features of many different coatings to be a superb all round product. CIO is semi self etching, so has high adhesion to many different substrates such as steel, keyed aluminium, and corrosion. Its a black satin finish so gives a great OEM look, stabilises corrosion, is a primer so can be top coated, and is also a top coat so doesn't have to be over coated. Add to this it is a zero rust creep product, can be applied by various means, is very tough with Impregnated Toughened glass flake and is very fast cure it is one of our most popular products. Available in :- AEROSOLS PAINT TINS 125ML > 5000ML Good for Direct to light to medium firmly adherent rust primer for most 1k and 2k coatings. (test patch first) Compatible with some synthetics once fully cured. Good protection of many different metals such as aluminium, and and steel. Production Environment/ Time limited application. Suitable for Harsh environments such as under vehicles, marine, or coastal environments suspension components Use as a two coat solution with no need to top coat patch repair work on vehicles such as spot corrosion repair Poor for Has extremely good opacity. It is therefore very easy to not put enough on as the substrate appears "protected". Fast cure coating so in windy/ high temperature scenarios it can be impossible to use. Mildly contamination intolerant. Requires good prep to be effective. Preparation Remove all Loose paint, wax, and underseal using a paint remover. If any wax/underseal/wet wax was used previously it must be THOROUGHLY removed with a solvent degreaser. Provide a key for maximum adhesion (use an abrasive to achieve this) If any grease, or contamination is present remove with a suitable product such as panel wipe or contamination killer Clean down the surface using clean water and a Scotchbrite type scourer before drying. There is no requirement to remove all rust. You are looking ideally for a clean, dull surface, providing the coating something to adhere to. If applying to medium to heavier corrosion manual application by wetting out brush should be used. Precaution should be taken that on heavier corrosion CIO is not applied in a warm breezy environment as it will cure too fast and not wet out correctly. Apply the coating in a vigorous manner, working the coating in to the substrate. Air bubbles are likely to raise to the surface as the product is agitated and continues to wet out. Best prep is direct to the base metal, but can overcoat most other coatings. Test patches if unsure. Application AEROSOL Shake the can for two full minutes with the agitating ball active. Apply in cross coats at 90 degree angles allowing the coating to cure between coats. Coating will take 5>15 minutes to tack off, and around 1/2 a day to fully harden. can be over coated with CIO as soon as its touch dry, leave longer if doing heavier coats with a brush or similar. Following application if the entire aerosol is not used invert the can fully and depress the nozzle for 2>3 seconds to clear the actuator so it can be used again later. Consider an aerosol unblocker kit. CIO aerosols can block within a minute if you do not clear the nozzle after each use. Be sure to apply enough product. "Blacking" is the process of applying enough product to cover an item with colour, but not enough to protect it. Failure typically occurs within 6 months, and will result in spot rust and sub surface corrosion occurring. You are aiming for Sufficient DFT (Dry Film Thickness) to cover the piece properly. CIO has extremely good opacity, and will black a substrate with only around 30% of the actual amount of product needed for a typical application. ALWAYS a minimum of two coats. Heavy corrosion up to 5 coats with the aerosol. If unsure contact us. TINNED Stir and agitate the product thoroughly prior to use using an agitator. The product can be brushed, rollered or sprayed. Brushed Using a seam sealing, or turkshead brush, work the first coat in to the substrate/ metal you are looking to protect. This has the added benefit of greatly increasing the ability of the product to wet out benefiting the application in several ways. After you have applied your first coat, allow it to cure for 30> 60 minutes typically. Apply your second coat using a large softer brush so as not to damage the first coat. The coating will tend to self-level and leave you a good finish. Coating will take 18>36 hours depending on conditions to fully harden. 2 coats for a prepared base, or light corrosion, 3 coats medium corrosion. Rollered We recommend you use a long handled narrow roller for application. This gives you a higher pressure of application for the roller, assisting wetting out properties, and gives you better access and control. The solvents in CIO can attack cheap rollers. Purchase rollers that are solvent compatible. Apply the first coat using reasonable force and a slow pass with the roller. Repeat the rollering process in the same area several times if existing corrosion is present to assist wetting out and adhesion later on. Do not spread the product out so far that you reduce the amount of coating, and thus reduce the protection available. Allow coating to cure semi-hard for a few hours depending on conditions, prior to adding a second or third coat. Ensure coating is hard dry prior to use. 2 coats for a prepared base, or light corrosion, 3 coats medium corrosion. Sprayed CIO Can be sprayed by various means. Buzzweld underbody gun. Extend the nozzle on the gun fully and set the pressure to a minimum of 90 psi. pressure can be elevated up to 150psi, the product warmed, or thinned to affect coverage, film thickness, and conditions of use. CIO Sprays very well in this gun with minimal spitting Buzzweld 1.8MM Suction Feed gun. Thin CIO using CIO Thinners up to 15%. Using a 400 Micron strainer load the gun with product, and set the pressure between 60- and 70 psi. Thin the MINIMUM so you can use less coats and save time. Spray as per normal spraying instructions, building up the product. We would suggest you allow the product to cure for a few hours, and then apply a minimum of a second coat. Three would be ideal, but time or requirement may not permit this. 3 coats medium corrosion. 4 for heavier corrosion. (2 can be used if not thinning too much, and corrosion isn't too heavy. you will need to use heavier coats, and adjust your cure and overcoating times accordingly). Compatibility CIO is unlikely to react with most products used correctly. Sensible guidelines to reduce the risk of product reactions are as follows. Ensure that any existing product to be top coated with CIO is FULLY cured prior to top coating. There is a big difference between hard and fully cured. For example 2 pack acrylics can be hard same day, but take up to two weeks to fully harden so that they can be machine polished. If a reaction has occurred, or is suspected, such as insufficient cure time available, then use a light first coat, with minimal thinner if spraying. If using an aerosol, then spray from a greater distance, and do not not flood, or build the product too fast. effectively "dust" the first coat. Subsequent coats can be applied with increasing build, and reduced risk of reaction If a coating reacts even after sufficient cure time, contact us for advise, or use a Barcoat Isolator as an intermediary coating. Notable attributes Stabilises corrosion using rust to protect the base metal. Tough, touch dry coating, with good resistance to abrasion, and a high build. Superb wetting out properties reinforced with extreme resistance to porosity. Ideal as an all in one fast applied solution for chassis and vehicle parts. Can be top coated with most industrial and automotive coatings. semi self etching, so high adhesion to most substrates. DO. Always a minimum of two coats Always allow the first coat a suitable cure period prior to second or third coat. apply to dry, clean, non contaminated surface Key the surface to a dull finish Extra pre if the existing coating is a wet waxoil type product, or an underseal. DO NOT Use fossil fuel heaters in or around coatings when applying or curing. They are not only a fire hazard, but they introduce massive amounts of moisture to the air. Use Cellulose thinners of any kind as prep, or a thinning agent. Use thinners to thin the product that are not CIO specific thinners. CIO is a specific hybrid coating, and using the incorrect thinners can cause premature failure, delamination, and porosity. Apply to a wet substrate without specific advice from ourselves first. Top coat existing coatings that are not fully cured "Clean" the surface with thinners COVERAGE Aerosol 1/2 can per wheel arch 6 cans for a small chassis 6 cans for a large chassis (if using a primer) 8>10 cans for a large chassis no primer 4 cans for a small chassis cavity 6 cans for a large chassis cavity Tinned 8.5M2/1000ML 2500ML for a chassis and axles up to 110 size if not pitted/ rough profile. 8.5M2/1000ML if top coating a primer with a smooth substrate 7.3m2/1000ML if top coating a rough substrate with no primer 300ML per average wheel arch (using two coats) CURETIMES (Typical) Please be aware cure times can vary wildly. Air movement, film thickness, relative humidity, air flow and temperature all play a large part in the actual cure time of a product. Additionally temperatures below 10C can see the cure times extend exponentially if all conditions above contribute in a negative way. Aerosol 10C Touch Dry 20 minutes, Hard dry 2>4 hours, through dry 18>24 hours 20C Touch Dry 5>10 minutes, Hard dry 1>2 hours, through dry 8>18 hours Tinned 10C Touch Dry 40 minutes, Hard dry 6>8 hours, through dry 24>36 hours 20C Touch Dry 20 minutes, Hard dry 2>4 hours, through dry 12>24 hours
  16. Product Description RCP Rust Control Primer is your closest modern equivalent to Old Red Lead with some added advantages Unlike a solids heavy single pack such as most cold galvanising products, or two pack products, RCP is the perfect blend of solids for application directly to corrosion. Contrary to media and press marketing techniques you need a compromise between these two attributes. Wetting out is explained in more depth here. Moving on from that article the higher the solids content of a product, the harder it is for it to wet out and follow the profile of the item you are painting correctly, however, too high a solvent content and you will not get enough physical product left on piece you are trying to protect. RCP will wet out incredibly well using not only the correct balance of solids vs solvent, but because it is a SLOW CURE product it has more time to complete this task prior to setting to its DFT (dry film thickness). This is why RCP will consistently out perform even CIO Chassis In One (because it is a fast cure), and 2K Armour (because of its solids content) on Heavier corrosion. Above and beyond most coatings RCP contains a pigment that takes rust in its reactive form, and over a period of around 9 months stabilises it to Magnetite. To summarise RCP wets out extremely well, leaves a high build film behind protecting the peaks of the substrate, takes long enough to cure to be effective in searching out moisture and air, whilst using the rough profile of corrosion for adhesion, all the while stabilising what is already there without having to burn or remove it. The coating once cured is very tough, doesn't suffer from Sub surface corrosion which can spread and lead to Rust creep, does not require top coating, and remains semi flexible. Available in :- AEROSOLS PAINT TINS 125ML > 5000ML Good for Direct to heavier firmly adherent rust primer for most automotive 2 pack, and acrylic based products Compatible with many synthetic products Long term protection of keyed steel (corroded, or clean steel) Suitable for Harsh environments such as under vehicles, marine, or coastal environments suspension components Use as a two coat solution with no need to top coat (note. colour is teracotta) patch repair work on vehicles such as spot corrosion repair Poor for Fast repair Fast cure coating compatibility (if you want to use a fast cure top coat, you will require an extended cure period, and test patching). Preparation Remove all Loose paint, wax, and underseal using a paint remover. Provide a key for maximum adhesion (use an abrasive to achieve this) If any grease, or contamination is present remove with a suitable product such as panel wipe or contamination killer Clean down the surface using clean water and a Scotchbrite type scourer before drying. There is no requirement to remove all rust. You are looking ideally for a clean, dull surface, providing the coating something to adhere to. If applying to medium to heavy corrosion manual application by wetting out brush should be used. Apply the coating in a vigorous manner, working the coating in to the substrate. Air bubbles are likely to raise to the surface as the product is agitated and continues to wet out. Best prep is direct to the base metal, but can overcoat most other coatings. Test patches if unsure. Application AEROSOL Shake the can for two full minutes with the agitating ball active. Apply in cross coats at 90 degree angles allowing the coating to cure between coats. Coating will take 15>45 minutes hours to tack off, and around 1 day to fully harden. can be over coated with RCP once touch dry. following application if the entire aerosol is not used invert the can fully and depress the nozzle for 2>3 seconds to clear the actuator so it can be used again later. Consider an aerosol unblocker kit. Be sure to apply enough product. "Blacking" is the process of applying enough product to cover an item with colour, but not enough to protect it. Failure typically occurs within 6 months, and will result in spot rust and sub surface corrosion occurring. You are aiming for Sufficient DFT (Dry Film Thickness) to cover the piece properly. ALWAYS a minimum of two coats. Heavy corrosion up to 5 coats with the aerosol. If unsure contact us. TINNED Stir and agitate the product thoroughly prior to use using an agitator. The product can be brushed, rollered or sprayed. Brushed Using a seam sealing, or turkshead brush, work the first coat in to the substrate/ metal you are looking to protect. This has the added benefit of greatly increasing the ability of the product to wet out benefiting the application in several ways. After you have applied your first coat, allow it to cure for 1>2 hours typically. Apply your second coat using a large softer brush so as not to damage the first coat. The coating will tend to self-level and leave you a good finish. Coating will take a few days depending on conditions to fully harden. 2 coats medium corrosion. 3 for heavier corrosion. Rollered We recommend you use a long handled narrow roller for application. This gives you a higher pressure of application for the roller, assisting wetting out properties, and gives you better access and control. Apply the first coat using reasonable force and a slow pass with the roller. Repeat the rollering process in the same area several times if existing corrosion is present to assist wetting out and adhesion later on. Do not spread the product out so far that you reduce the amount of coating, and thus reduce the protection available. Allow coating to cure semi-hard for a few hours depending on conditions, prior to adding a second or third coat. Ensure coating is hard dry prior to use. 2 coats medium corrosion. 3 for heavier corrosion. Sprayed RCP Can be sprayed by various means. Buzzweld underbody gun. Extend the nozzle on the gun fully and set the pressure to a minimum of 90 psi. pressure can be elevated up to 150psi, the product warmed, or thinned to affect coverage, film thickness, and conditions of use. RCP will tend to spit in this gun, but as part of a kit to get the job done is passable. Product will self level to a degree once applied. Buzzweld 1.8MM Suction Feed gun. Thin RCP using RCP Thinners up to 15%. Using a 400 Micron strainer load the gun with product, and set the pressure between 60- and 70 psi. Thin the MINIMUM so you can use less coats and save time. Spray as per normal spraying instructions, building up the product. We would suggest you allow the product to cure for a few hours, and then apply a minimum of a second coat. Three would be ideal, but time or requirement may not permit this. 3 coats medium corrosion. 4 for heavier corrosion. (2 can be used if not thinning too much, and corrosion isn't too heavy. you will need to use heavier coats, and adjust your cure and overcoating times accordingly). Compatibility RCP is unlikely to react with most products used correctly. Sensible guidelines to reduce the risk of product reactions are as follows. Ensure that any existing product to be top coated with RCP is FULLY cured prior to top coating. There is a big difference between hard and fully cured. For example 2 pack acrylics can be hard same day, but take up to two weeks to fully harden so that they can be machine polished. If a reaction has occurred, or is suspected, such as insufficient cure time available, then use a light first coat, with minimal thinner if spraying. If using an aerosol, then spray from a greater distance, and do not not flood, or build the product too fast. effectively "dust" the first coat. Subsequent coats can be applied with increasing build, and reduced risk of reaction If a coating reacts even after sufficient cure time, contact us for advise, or use a Barcoat Isolator as an intermediary coating. Notable attributes Stabilises corrosion using rust to protect the base metal. Tough, touch dry coating, with good resistance to abrasion, and a high build Superb wetting out properties reinforced with extreme resistance to porosity. Ideal as a primer for WAR, CIO, HD Gloss, Gloss Extreme and 0 DO. Always a minimum of two coats Always allow the first coat a suitable cure period prior to second or third coat. apply to dry, clean, non contaminated surface Key the surface to a dull finish DO NOT Use fossil fuel heaters in or around coatings when applying or curing. They are not only a fire hazard, but they introduce massive amounts of moisture to the air. Use Cellulose thinners of any kind as prep, or a thinning agent. Use thinners to thin the product that are not RCP specific thinners. RCP is a specific hybrid coating, and using the incorrect thinners can cause premature failure, delamination, and porosity. Apply to a wet substrate without specific advice from ourselves first. Top coat existing coatings that are not fully cured "Clean" the surface with thinners COVERAGE Aerosol 1/2 can per wheel arch 6 cans for a small chassis 6 cans for a large chassis (if using a primer) 8>10 cans for a large chassis no primer 4 cans for a small chassis cavity 6 cans for a large chassis cavity Tinned 12M2/1000ML 2500ML for a chassis and axles up to 110 size 12M2/1000ML if top coating a primer with a smooth substrate 8m2/1000ML if top coating a rough substrate with no primer 300ML per average wheel arch (using two coats) CURETIMES (Typical) Please be aware cure times can vary wildly. Air movement, film thickness, relative humidity, air flow and temperature all play a large part in the actual cure time of a product. Additionally temperatures below 10C can see the cure times extend exponentially if all conditions above contribute in a negative way. Aerosol 10C Touch Dry 40 minutes, Hard dry 4>8 hours, through dry 24>36 hours 20C Touch Dry 20 minutes, Hard dry 1>2 hours, through dry 12>24 hours Tinned 10C Touch Dry 90 minutes, Hard dry 6>8 hours, through dry 48>72 hours 20C Touch Dry 60 minutes, Hard dry 2>4 hours, through dry 36>48 hours
  17. Always going to find more as you dig deeper, but its great when its back together and you know you sorted it properly.
  18. Not problem Al.
  19. The front starts out as a FJ60 housing, gets everything cut off it, including the stock sheet metal diff cover and knuckle balls and cleaned up, both housings will be media blasted to bare steel for 2K Armor, CIO and WAR coatings. The inside where the knuckle balls set are nicely machined, both sides get the machined area deepened. The long side to be shortened and the short side to be shortened 1" so when the extension sleeve is added it will be correct length. The extension sleeve and knuckle ball fit tightly, in the pic they are just part way inserted for the pic. The front is drilled and tapped for the Ruff Stuff Diff cover to bolt on. The front and rear diff covers make a nice way to inspect the diffs in addition to protecting the gears inside. Then then the caster and pinion angles are set and the spring perches welded on. Hopefully the machine work will be done next week. Both the front and rear housings are getting trusses and some reinforcements also. If I am posting too many pics and going into too much detail please let me know. Cheers, Allen
  20. Here is some info on the rear axle. Starting with FJ60 housing, cut around the drum flange and knock them off. Under the flange is a nice machined surface that is parallel with each other that makes lining up things easier. Both of the machined surfaces will be extended inwards. The long side so it can be shortened and the short side so it can be lengthened. A 3.5" OD tube will have the ID machined to fit over the machined surfaces and Ruff Stuff Disc/FF will be welded on housing and tubes. FJ60 front spindles bolt to these amd front hubs go on the spindles. The inside of the spindles get machined to fit Marlin Crawler Ecoseals to keep gear oil in housing, the hubs run grease like they do in the front. A spindle with Ecoseal fitted. Then the pinion angle is set and the spring perches welded on and a Ruff Stuff diff cover is bolted on for protection. Cheers, Allen
  21. Thanks Craig, I have been thinking and designing out this build for almost a year now. It has slowly come together with input and suggestions from others and from a lot of reading and research. :-) It's really important to me that she looks "right' when all said and done. As Dave Marsh put it, it will look like a SIIA, but somehow different and will need to be checked out to see whats different. Also for me it's not just about looking nice or impressive, but whats really important is the details that make it up, that everything is done right, components and parts chosen and built so everything is balanced and doesn't have few areas or aspects out of line with the overall build and purpose of the truck. I want her to be a very capable, rugged, reliable and long lasting truck that can go most anywhere within reason. But not an extreme or extreme looking specialized truck. To look rugged, serious, not military looking, but with the no frills purposeful look of a military truck, sort of mil spec built. If that makes sense. lol Cheers, Allen
  22. Thought I best start my thread to help me Put it back together when I've finished stripping it down and show others some of products from the buzzweld shop that I am using. Looking at the other builds here it cant't really be called a rebuild as it's mostly paint This is it as purchased Dec 2012 and last week when the strip own started, After a couple of days I have reached, Hopefully over the next week I can get it fully stripped and expose all the panels that need work, at the moment it just the rear floor, front and second row seat box, and top inside corners of the bulkhead, the rest looks solid. 🀞
  23. Just to say thanks to Craig for giving me some time to talk to him about what I thought would be suitable and getting the volumes sorted so that I wouldn't run out or be left with too much surplus, even when it's him that loses part of the sale. great customer service so far πŸ‘πŸ‘
  24. thats really good info on that. well thought out
  25. Decided to use Marlin Crawler 25mm steering pin upgrade & high steer arms. This is practically the same strength as D60. And use OEM 4 stud steering knuckles and ARP 2000 knuckle studs. Ruff Stuff 23mm weld in tubing adapters. To go in 1.5"X ΒΌ DOM and FJ80 Tie Rod Ends. Which are almost as big as GM 1 ton TREs. The Tie Rods will be tucked above the springs & well out or harms way. Will be ordering these next week and the dumb irons, outriggers & rear sprin hangers from Richards Chassis. Rocky Mountain Spares will be shipping two sets of rear Parabolic springs out as soon as they get back from the shows end of August. Will be cutting metal in couple weeks! Can't wait! :-) I need to get with Craig and get my first order put in so it can be sent to Dave Marsh to be put on the pallet with the 300Tdi, R380, LT230 & the regalvanized windscreen frame and cappings for their trip to Hawaii first week or so of September. I'll post some pics of the axle housings all stripped & ready to have the ends machined in a few days. Cheers, Allen
  26. That is a huge build, and nothing like what I thought it would be! keep us uodated, that is going to be a reall one of a kind, with so much custom work.
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